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Archive for the ‘History’ Category

If you ever looked at the Wikipedia’s List of Punahou Alumni you’d see that it is a lengthy entry, filled with dozens and dozens of superstars in a variety of fields. Unsurprisingly, many of these are women.

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March was Women’s History Month. This year the Punahou Archives created a Women’s History display that featured women who made history at Punahou School. Who made the list?

Recognize the name Kaahumanu? She lived part-time beside the lily pond at Kapunahou. The stone wall that fronts Wilder Avenue was constructed by her and is now a national monument. It was she who convinced Liliha to gift Punahou’s lands (224 Manoa and 77 acres near Kewalo Basin) to Hiram Bingham for the Sandwich Islands Mission in 1829.

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Mary Persis Winnie

Recognize the name, Mary Persis Winnie? Of course you do.

 

Our grades one to four were spent in the Winnie Units, a structure that now lives only in our memories. It was named in honor of the school’s elementary principal (1898-1941).

Recognize the name Claire Olsen ’58 Johnson? In 2011, she became the first woman to lead the Punahou School Board of Trustees. She served on the Board from 1974-2015.

Other firsts include Dr. Emily McCarren (first woman Academy Principal) and Charlotte Kamikawa (first woman Director of Physical Plant).

What, you don’t know the ones in the last two paragraphs?

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Terece Stovall ’72

Of course, you graduated years ago and don’t know the intimacies regarding the ins and outs of school leadership.

But what about two firsts, two firsts that occurred in a time you know, the time being the early seventies? Better yet, the only two student “firsts” that made the cut!

How about Terece Stovall ’72 (attended 1966-1972)? She was the first woman enrolled in Punahou’s Army Junior Reserve Training Corps program. Her enrollment compelled the opening of the military program to other women throughout Hawaii the following year.

 

Now, if you haven’t guessed by now, there’s a Punahou74 connection to this post. A Punahou74 woman who made the list.

Who is it?

(more…)

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We’re all familiar with the saying, “Join the Navy and See the World.” Even the Navy sells this as an enlistment benefit noting that “the vessels that you will serve on will sail to the corners of the Earth and you will stop in many different ports.” Of course, that’s because the Navy member is serving on the ship itself. I didn’t know that there were incidental benefits for family members!

View from Bridge

VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE of the USN Richard E. Byrd at Apra Harbor in Guam.

Truth be it, the family member to whom I am referring is in the Merchant Marines, not the United States Navy. But it’s still a job that takes you to the four corners of the Earth. Right?

And as to the incidental benefits? In this case they relate to the service of (more…)

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And who do you identify with? The child or the parent? David or his mom?

1964Scrambler

OOPS! THE SCREWS WERE LOOSE!! 1964 Na Opio take on riding the Scrambler.

Thanks to my mom and Punahou moms everywhere who put up with the annual madness …

MOM RIDES HERD ON FOUR IN HECTIC DAY AT CARNIVAL (Butwin, David. The Honolulu Advertiser. 8 Feb. 1964.)

Think you could keep up with four little boys at a carnival?

Mrs. Peter (more…)

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They don’t make themselves, you know.

Waiting Malasada Customers

A common sight at the malasada booth: anxious customers waiting for their malasadas.

It’s a recognized problem. One that was known even 45 years ago when Punahou74 was running the show. (more…)

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The first day of school is a time of celebration. New books, new teachers, new year. Of these special days, none is as significant as July 11, 1842: the day students first attended school at Ka Punahou.

Early Lily Pond

AN EARLY VIEW OF THE LILY POND: The spring divided into several streams which flowed through the grounds — “carried along to water the taro and in one channel to water the garden near the [former Bingham] house, in another to run through the pantry to keep it cool, in another to meet a little vineyard back of the house.” (Punahou Archives Photo)

The path to the first day of school was a long and difficult one for the protestant missionaries who founded Punahou. These were educated people, people who desired and valued educational opportunities for their own children:

The time has arrived (more…)

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One of Punahou’s regular 50th reunion events is the reception for faculty and staff who worked with the class. This year the class of 1967 met with such class notables as Tiger Tom Metcalf, Barbara Earle, and Joan Pratt. Who will Punahou74 be inviting to its reception in 2024?

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Do you remember her? (1973 Oahuan photo)

As luck would have it, two potential invitees are still hard at work on campus. One, Mr. Moore, will see his final semester this fall. I still remember his English classes. Two of my children share that memory with me. That’s a lot of Shakespeare over the years!

The second potential invitee is celebrating 45 years of Punahou service this year. That would mean that she came to Punahou when we were mere juniors.

Do you remember this long-serving teacher?

If you don’t, here is an article celebrating her Punahou tenure as published in the May 8 edition of Kamailio, the Punahou School Faculty and Staff News publication. (more…)

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Strange how you can find Punahou74 classmates in the most interesting places.

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The Reverend Lorrin Andrews describes his work at Lahainaluna Seminary on Maui.

Friday, June 16, was opening night for Cemetery Pupu Theatre at Oahu Cemetery. Sponsored by the Hawaiian Mission Houses Historic Site and Archives, I had volunteered to guide guests to the night’s various performances. By doing so I was able to enjoy what is a perennially¬† in-demand event: all four shows had been quickly sold out.

In addition to enlightening¬† conversation and good food (hence the “pupu” in the title) the evening features outdoor theater in an unusual setting. Nestled between the picturesque grave markers, are tents at which actors are stationed to play individuals significant in Hawaii’s history. It’s a location perfect for (more…)

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