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Archive for the ‘Faculty/Staff’ Category

If you ever looked at the Wikipedia’s List of Punahou Alumni you’d see that it is a lengthy entry, filled with dozens and dozens of superstars in a variety of fields. Unsurprisingly, many of these are women.

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March was Women’s History Month. This year the Punahou Archives created a Women’s History display that featured women who made history at Punahou School. Who made the list?

Recognize the name Kaahumanu? She lived part-time beside the lily pond at Kapunahou. The stone wall that fronts Wilder Avenue was constructed by her and is now a national monument. It was she who convinced Liliha to gift Punahou’s lands (224 Manoa and 77 acres near Kewalo Basin) to Hiram Bingham for the Sandwich Islands Mission in 1829.

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Mary Persis Winnie

Recognize the name, Mary Persis Winnie? Of course you do.

 

Our grades one to four were spent in the Winnie Units, a structure that now lives only in our memories. It was named in honor of the school’s elementary principal (1898-1941).

Recognize the name Claire Olsen ’58 Johnson? In 2011, she became the first woman to lead the Punahou School Board of Trustees. She served on the Board from 1974-2015.

Other firsts include Dr. Emily McCarren (first woman Academy Principal) and Charlotte Kamikawa (first woman Director of Physical Plant).

What, you don’t know the ones in the last two paragraphs?

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Terece Stovall ’72

Of course, you graduated years ago and don’t know the intimacies regarding the ins and outs of school leadership.

But what about two firsts, two firsts that occurred in a time you know, the time being the early seventies? Better yet, the only two student “firsts” that made the cut!

How about Terece Stovall ’72 (attended 1966-1972)? She was the first woman enrolled in Punahou’s Army Junior Reserve Training Corps program. Her enrollment compelled the opening of the military program to other women throughout Hawaii the following year.

 

Now, if you haven’t guessed by now, there’s a Punahou74 connection to this post. A Punahou74 woman who made the list.

Who is it?

(more…)

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One of Punahou’s regular 50th reunion events is the reception for faculty and staff who worked with the class. This year the class of 1967 met with such class notables as Tiger Tom Metcalf, Barbara Earle, and Joan Pratt. Who will Punahou74 be inviting to its reception in 2024?

Kishimoto73Oahuan

Do you remember her? (1973 Oahuan photo)

As luck would have it, two potential invitees are still hard at work on campus. One, Mr. Moore, will see his final semester this fall. I still remember his English classes. Two of my children share that memory with me. That’s a lot of Shakespeare over the years!

The second potential invitee is celebrating 45 years of Punahou service this year. That would mean that she came to Punahou when we were mere juniors.

Do you remember this long-serving teacher?

If you don’t, here is an article celebrating her Punahou tenure as published in the May 8 edition of Kamailio, the Punahou School Faculty and Staff News publication. (more…)

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The Punahou Alumni Association’s recognition of outstanding alumni has become a regular part of the school’s Alumni Week in the last few years. Despite 2017 being a non-reunion year, Punahou74’s presence at the ceremony was hard to ignore. You should’ve been there!

2017 PAA Awards

AWARDS READY TO GO. Marcia’s and Scott’s are the second and third in line. Since they were first given out in 1954, 165 awards have been made to alumni. The oldest recipient? O-in-Life winner George Paul Cooke of the class of 1895. Twelve 1970-decade graduates have also won over time: four of them members from the great class of 1974!

No, it’s not because of the kalua sliders, chicken potstickers, shrimp cocktail, and caramel cuts that filled our plates that attendance was a must-do. It’s because it is no (more…)

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June 9, 2016 was a day to party on the Punahou campus; a day that would include one of the last celebrations of the 175th anniversary year.

Punahou 175th Party

Can you name all of the Punahou74 party goers pictured above? Hint: One person is a mystery guest. This person is not a class member but is and is known by all Punahou74 classmates. Answers below.

The night included a variety of distractions: (more…)

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Michael Woodward wanted to let you know that (more…)

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We all knew her and can all share stories of what it was like to work with her. But did you really know her?

Mrs. de Holczer with Trustees Thurston Twigg-Smith, left, and Richard Power. (Punahou Bulletin picture and caption)

Here’s what was written about our class dean, Marian de Holczer, in the Autumn 1974 edition of the Punahou Bulletin upon the occasion of her retirement:

Marian de Holczer, Dean of the Class of 1974, who, after 25 years, bade aloha to Punahou along with her class in June. Her career with the school began in 1941, was interrupted by (more…)

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Amelia Bailey, Punahou School icon recently passed away. Though not a Punahou graduate, Mrs. Bailey had an enormous impact on the school as a parent, volunteer, and Costume Coordinator. So generous were these contributions was she that she was recognized by the Punahou Alumni Association with the “Old School” award in 1980. In a 1985 oral history she gave for the school she recounted many of her experiences, several of which intersected with the Punahou Class of 1974. Here, for your recollection, is a look at how Amelia Bailey made a difference to our class and to the lives of many others.

Amelia Bailey

Mrs. Bailey’s first became involved with Punahou when her oldest child (Beryl Leoani Bailey ’64) registered for kindergarten in 1951. Why Punahou for this 1941 graduate of Kamehameha School for Girls? Because it “was a good place for her to be if they would accept her, because it was close to [our Manoa] home, and the reputation of their education program was just superior.” Things must have worked out okay, because four sons (James Radcliffe Bailey ’66, Robert Clifton Bailey ’68, William (more…)

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