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Prayers and aloha to Albert’s family and friends.

HONDA 12

ALBERT HONDA as pictured in the 1974 Oahuan. The picture was captioned as follows: “If you’re looking at my picture and remembering me, chances are I’ll be looking at yours and remembering YOU!”

Albert Honda passed away in Honolulu’s Saint Francis Hospice on Continue Reading »

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Want to get together with Punahou74 classmates? Want to help the Punahou Carnival cause but feel that the malasada booth is not your cup of tea? Like a cooler setting, a place to sit, and a the susurrus of quiet conversation? Read on!

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Catherine Tompkison models one of her floral lei. She says that she made more than 30 lei for Punahou Carnival 2017. 100% sold, of course!

After years of hearing, “I’d like to help but, gee … the malasada booth? Can’t we do something else?” Now you can.

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They don’t make themselves, you know.

Waiting Malasada Customers

A common sight at the malasada booth: anxious customers waiting for their malasadas.

It’s a recognized problem. One that was known even 45 years ago when Punahou74 was running the show. Continue Reading »

Already expanding with a second office? It was just a little while ago that the business opened!

Greenwich Harbor Partners

Congratulations to Ted Pryor and his firm, Greenwich Harbor Partners, on the recent opening of its San Francisco office at 995 Market Street.

As the worlds of traditional business confront rapidly developing new technologies, Greenwich Harbor Partners is expanding its ability serve customers in the SF Bay Area and recruit technology savvy candidates to our nation-wide client base. Customers are increasingly demanding a seamless and intuitive end-to-end experience and building this requires a mix of traditional and digital skills. Many companies are looking for a blend of skills that includes digital transformation to modernize general management, marketing, sales and customer service. In addition, Silicon Valley-based companies are increasingly looking at the nationwide talent pool for seasoned executives with industry experience who are used to managing growth at scale.

Says Ted about the expansion, “We are Continue Reading »

Some classmates are difficult to eulogize, so little is known about them. That is not the case with Billy Richardson. Click anywhere online. He’s there.
Bill Richardson kindergarten

“FREAR FROLICS” IN KINDERGARTEN- LEFT: Carolyn Ing, Lynne Gartley, Bill Richardson, Dick Libbey, Mrs. Bush, Assistant to Miss Linton. (1961 Na Opio O Punahou photo)

Billy may have been one of the oldest members of Punahou74. And, while all babies are cause for celebration, his arrival was fodder for public recognition. As noted in the May 1955 Punahou Bulletin (Class of 1938 notes):

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Keeping up with the Punahou74 prayer chain is a necessary but wrenching aspect of writing this blog. The loss of each and every classmate represents a forever loss of Punahou74’s history as well as a part of our corporate hearts. Since this blog’s 2009 premiere, the focus has been on these losses as they relate to classmates/faculty/staff with an exception which has been observed only once: the loss of a Punahou74 child. Sadly, it is time for a second exception.

Ryan Onopa

Ryder Kalani Onapa as pictured in the 2005 Oahuan.

Ryder Kalani Onopa, MD (Punahou05) passed away from cancer on August 17, 2017. He is survived by Punahou74’s Janet Kemble Onopa and her husband, Bob, his brother Alex (Punahou10) and his dog Sky. He was 30 years old.

Ryder’s death was noted in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser on August 24 in an article that is typically written for those of greater years. In an excellent piece, the story was headlined  “Hawaii physician known for intellect, compassion.” Reading the story imbues one with the sense of loss, the knowledge of a life Continue Reading »

The first day of school is a time of celebration. New books, new teachers, new year. Of these special days, none is as significant as July 11, 1842: the day students first attended school at Ka Punahou.

Early Lily Pond

AN EARLY VIEW OF THE LILY POND: The spring divided into several streams which flowed through the grounds — “carried along to water the taro and in one channel to water the garden near the [former Bingham] house, in another to run through the pantry to keep it cool, in another to meet a little vineyard back of the house.” (Punahou Archives Photo)

The path to the first day of school was a long and difficult one for the protestant missionaries who founded Punahou. These were educated people, people who desired and valued educational opportunities for their own children:

The time has arrived Continue Reading »