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I am sorry to again be the bearer of sad news regarding another departed classmate. Mahalo and prayers to Ann’s husband, Bob, who forwarded this information.

Ann Wilkinson

SENIOR PICTURE: Ann Wilkinson as shown in the 1974 Oahuan.

Ann Carolyn Springer

Nov. 1, 1956 – April 15, 2015

Ann was born in Honolulu in November 1956 and raised in Continue Reading »

Excellent news has been received! Carrie Chang Talwar has ended her seventeen month recovery in California and is back home in Hawaii to continue her recuperation. More news on how you can cheer Carrie on as it becomes available.  

During the Friday night reunion party Punahou74 classmates signed a poster offering wishes for the recovery of Carrie Chang Talwar. Yuriko Wellington volunteered to take that poster and a reunion shirt to Carrie. Here’s Yuriko’s report of what happened when she delivered the items to Carrie last summer.

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Yuriko Wellington shows the lily pond poster that was signed by Punahou74 Friday night at our 40th reunion to both Jay and Carrie Talwar.

I got back a little while ago from a trip down to San Diego to visit Carrie Talwar. Jay, and his mom were also there, so we had a nice little Continue Reading »

With all of the reunion activity I forgot to recognize a Punahou74 child who graduated with the Punahou School class of 2014. My sincere apologies. Such achievements deserve notice.

Punahou School Class of 2014As we all know, 2014 is 40 years after the graduation of the great Punahou School class of 1974. That said, I would have loved to have one of my children graduate on one of my reunion anniversaries. With four of them you would think I would have a good chance at it!

Alas, the numbers did not work. I will have to remain satisfied with sharing the luau tent with my father who, as a member of the class of 1949, graduated 25 years before Punahou74. (My grandfather was x-1919 so my father had his timing right on two counts!)

So who’s the lucky classmate … and recent graduate?

Continue Reading »

It’s been since 2009 that Richard Botkin’s book, Ride the Thunder, hit the bookshelves to great acclaim. With the release of the movie, it’s back in the news.

Ride the Thunder: A Vietnam War Story of Honor and Triumph tells the tale of American and Vietnamese Marines who fought the Communist invasion. Particular attention is paid to the 1972 Easter Offensive and the action Continue Reading »

Following the withdrawal of his nominee to head the Department of Land and Natural Resources it looks like Hawaii’s Governor Ige has, as explained by the Hawaii Star-Advertiser, done “better.”

SuzanneCaseReunion

Suzanne was part of the mix at our 40th reunion. L-r First Row Shannon Brownlee, Bryann Bromley Nuzzo, Shari Fink, Mary Madinger Balding Back Row: Linda de Silva Howe, Laurie Foster, Roseanne Mandell Levine, Ann Yoshida, Neal Higgins Walters, Mele Meyer, and finally, Suzanne Case!

 Pun aside, do you agree with the newspaper’s perspective?

Ige has good case for Suzanne Case

This time, Gov. David Ige did better.

His nomination of Suzanne Case to lead the state Department of Land and Natural Resources answers the complaints about the previous nominee, Carleton Ching, who lacked management experience and a background in conservation.

That’s not the case with Case.

As the Hawaii executive director of The Nature Conservancy since 2001, she oversees 16 preserves totaling 53,000 acres in Hawaii; she handled major projects, including the transfer of 117,000-acre Kahuku Ranch on the Big Island to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; and she leads a staff of 76 people and manages an annual budget of $11 million, according to the Conservancy’s website.

DLNR is a much larger and more complex operation, of course. But Case’s background suggests she won’t be going in unarmed.

Congratulations, Suzanne, and good luck with the approval process. I’m sure you’ll do well.

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The Pele Awards recognize the best advertising and design work created in Hawaii. All work entered must have been conceived and created within the Hawaiian Islands. Is it any surprise that the work of one of our Punahou74 classmates would be a big award winner in 2014?

Preston Wheeler with the roi, or peacock groupers, he speared in a tournament on the camp's last morning: In the village of Miloli'i, the next generation is learning to live from the sea in the old Hawaiian way.

Preston Wheeler with the roi, or peacock groupers, he speared in a tournament on the camp’s last morning. In the village of Milolii, the next generation is learning to live from the sea in the old Hawaiian way. (Photo caption: Michael Shapiro)

You know the song. The one that says, “What a beautiful day for fishing in the old Hawaiian way?”

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Justiss Decalio de-scales an uhu (parrotfish) using an opihi shell as a scraper. For generations the people of Milolii have been living from the sea, and they have preserved traditions lost in much of the rest of Hawaii. The camps are part of a broader effort to teach those traditions to Hawaii’s youth, many of whom will sustain themselves at least partly by fishing. (Photo caption: Michael Shapiro)

Monte Costa spent several days learning about fishing in the old Hawaiian way at the 2013 Milolii Lawaia Ohana Camp, a four-day summer program designed to teach and perpetuate traditional fishing. The event attracted almost fifty participants, ages ten to seventeen, and their families from Milolii and nearby towns such as Honaunau and Oceanview and from as far away aw Hilo, Kailua-Kona and even Honolulu.

The camp is run by Paa Pono Milolii, a nonprofit dedicated to improving the quality of life for the residents of the “Last Hawaiian Fishing Village in the State of Hawaii.”

No one knows what the future will hold for the tiny community of Milol’i or whether its next generation will be able to carry forward its culture. “We want our kids to become stewards again,” says camp organizer Kaimi Kaupiko. “We know we have something really special in Miloli’i because of our traditional fishing, and that needs to be shared with future generations.” (Photo caption: Michael Shapiro)

No one knows what the future will hold for the tiny community of Milol’i or whether its next generation will be able to carry forward its culture. “We want our kids to become stewards again,” says camp organizer Kaimi Kaupiko. “We know we have something really special in Miloli’i because of our traditional fishing, and that needs to be shared with future generations.” (Photo caption: Michael Shapiro)

But Monte wasn’t there for fun. She was there to work as the skilled photographer she is. The images that she captured were featured in the December 2013/January 2014 issue of Hana Hou! Hawaiian Airlines’ in-flight magazine.

When the story and photos were reviewed by the Pele Award judges they were wowed. Their decision? “Best of Award in Design” and a “Pele Gold” award. Talk about hauling in the hardware!

Monte is a regular contributor to Hana Hou! and you can learn more about her work in a previous blog post.

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Thank you to the many Punahou74 classmates who paid their last respects to Duane Maeda on February 25.

Hosoi Funeral Board

A sign of the times: “Funeral Service for the Late Mr. Duane Miki Maeda.”

Held at 6 p.m. at Hosoi Mortuary, Duane Maeda’s funeral service was well attended by his family, his coworkers, his friends, and his Punahou74 classmates.

The room was decorated with wreaths from family and business interests. Duane was employed at the Kahala Hotel and Resort. Several classmates reported seeing him often at banquet functions where he supervised the wait staff.

Songs included “Amazing Grace,” “Kanaka Wai Wai,” and “Aloha Oe.”

The service featured remarks by friends and family. It seems that Duane was a frequent traveler to Las Vegas and he reliably returned with excellent omiyage for all to share. A funny story was told of when, during one of these trips, he and a friend stopped a policeman to ask for directions. The place they sought? Continue Reading »

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