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Section 11343, Revised Laws of Hawaii 1945, refers  to the playing of prohibited games. This statute provides that every person who participates in or who conducts, either as an owner or employee, any specific type of game or any game in which money or anything of value is won or lost is guilty of a misdemeanor.

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1957 Carnival scene: Grant Marsh and Barbara Townsend splurge on a balloon from the happy vendor, Dave Ferguson. (1957 Oahuan photo and caption)

So read the February 7, 1957 letter from Dan Liu, Chief of Police (signed by Arthur M. Tarbell, Deputy Chief of Police), to Dr. John Fox, President of Punahou School. Walter F. Dillingham, President of the Board of Trustees, and Mrs. Robert S. Lowery, Carnival Chairwoman, were copied on the communication.

At issue was a January 1957 court ruling, made by Judge Harry R. Hewitt, that gambling is involved in “any game in which money or something of value is won or lost.” Because Carnival games offered prizes to its winners, game players were gambling and would, as stated in Chief Liu’s letter, be subject to the possibility “of embarrassment attendant to arrest and prosecution of any individual concerned either as operators or as participants.”

With this news being delivered on the eve of the start of the February 8-9 event fifty years ago this year, it seemed that the Carnival much attended midway was doomed.

What to do? Actually the answer was quite simple. According to Carnival Chairwoman Lowrey, “We just Continue Reading »

Are you up to the challenge? Join with Punahou74 classmates–and others–as we pursue The Ultimate Malasada Super Rush at Punahou Carnival 2017.

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Always room for you! Mary Madinger Balding, Babs Miyano Young, Lynne Obatake Yorita, and Lee Ann Nicolay enjoy a mini reunion while working at Punahou Carnival 2016.

 

The Ultimate Malasada Sugar Rush? What’s that you say?

Easy. It’s that Continue Reading »

While the Jose Feliciano song may be known for its macaronic verse, there was a singularity of the language spoken at this, Punahou74’s final kanreki celebration of the year.

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Carrie Chang Talwar was welcomed with open arms back into the Punahou74 fold. Pictured with her are Sheree Lum Orsi, Leslie Ching Allen, and Monica DelPiano Campanis.

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Thanks to Gaye Miyasaki for another get-together opportunity to celebrate our 60th birthdays.

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Jose’s is the place. Be there or be square (estar alli o ser cuadrado)!

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June 9, 2016 was a day to party on the Punahou campus; a day that would include one of the last celebrations of the 175th anniversary year.

Punahou 175th Party

Can you name all of the Punahou74 party goers pictured above? Hint: One person is a mystery guest. This person is not a class member but is and is known by all Punahou74 classmates. Answers below.

The night included a variety of distractions: Continue Reading »

Gaye Miyasaki is not just a Punahou74 party planner par excellence, she’s also a Punahou74 PR whiz too.

Punahou74 Generations Magazine

ARTICLE DESCRIBING PUNAHOU74’S VOLUNTEER EFFORT at the Lanakila Multipurpose Senior Center. Alvin Cabrinha, who took the picture, also volunteered.

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As Punahou celebrates the graduation of the class of 2016 this weekend, there will be one thing missing from the occasion, something that once was a seventy-year campus tradition: the bestowing of a class gift.

Punahou's Main Gates were a gift of the classes of 1931 and 1931.

Punahou’s Main Gates were a gift of the classes of 1931 and 1931.

Class gifts are a way for alumni to benefit current and future students while honoring their alma mater.¬† Punahou’s records document the gifts received from graduates dating back to 1904.

Commencement was a week-long affair in those days and featured events such as graduation, a dance, and Class Day. It was during this celebration on June 18, 1904 that class president, Harold Castle, introduced the first class gift. He spoke from the balcony to those gathered on the shady lawn in front of Pauahi Hall:

Mr. Castle said that Continue Reading »